Helen Oyeyemi
Helen Oyeyemi

Sparkling with wit and vibrancy, Boy, Snow, Bird reimagines the traditional Snow White narrative; focusing on three women and the strange connection between them.

JJ Bola
JJ Bola

The poet and author explores masculinity from an intersectional angle, looking at how contemporary notions of manhood are impacted by race, sexuality, class and varying political climates. Investigating how men of varying backgrounds, including LGBTQ+ men and male refugees, experience masculinity, Mask Off acts as a rallying cry for us to urgently redefine masculinity.

Victoria Princewill
Victoria Princewill

Inspired by the only existing first-person account of an Abyssinian slave in Iran, this original historical debut sheds light on the untold lives of two slaves torn away from their families residing in the Persian royal courts in the 1890s. Told from the perspective of Jamila, a concubine, and Abimelech, a eunuch, Princewill deftly sheds light into an oft-overlooked area of African history.

Nels Abbey
Nels Abbey

Former banker Nels Abbey takes on the persona of Dr Boulé Whytelaw III, a distinguished Professor of Modern White People Studies, in this satirical guide on the realities of working in white-dominated workplaces. As humorous as it dark, this memorable and timely “self-help gospel” touching on structural barriers faced by many.

Ashley Hickson-Lovence
Ashley Hickson-Lovence

Set entirely on a London bus travelling from Hoxton to Highbury, The 392 takes place over just 36 minutes and explores themes including terrorism and gentrification in inner-city London. The tale unfolds through a crowd of passengers from all different worlds – schoolkids, addicts, high-flyers and the homeless – who are all tied through a shared suspicion as the threat of terrorism looms.

Okechukwu Nzelu
Okechukwu Nzelu

How do you begin to find yourself when you only know half of who you are? As Nnenna Maloney approaches womanhood she longs to connect with her Igbo-Nigerian culture. Her once close and tender relationship with her mother, Joanie, becomes strained as Nnenna begins to ask probing questions about her father, who Joanie refuses to discuss. Nnenna is asking big questions of how to 'be' when she doesn't know the whole of who she is.

Paul Mendez
Paul Mendez

Rainbow Milk is an intersectional coming-of-age story, following nineteen-year-old Jesse McCarthy as he grapples with his racial and sexual identities against the backdrop of a Jehovah's Witness upbringing and the legacies of the Windrush generation.

Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi
Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi

This selection of short stories follow the journeys of Ugandans making England their home. Shifting between Manchester and Kampala, this brilliant collection vibrantly interrogates themes of belonging and identity.

Uzodinma Iweala
Uzodinma Iweala

Based in Washington D.C., Speak No Evil is the story of Niru, the gay son of conservative Nigerian parents. It is also the story of his white best friend, Meredith, and her own journey. Told in moving, elegant prose, the story encompasses multiple issues, geographies and perspectives, and adds the growing canon of Nigerian LGBT literature.

Shola von Reinhold
Shola von Reinhold

A working class Nigerian-British woman becomes obsessed with an obscure early twentieth-century Black female Scottish poet, and travels to a remote European artist's colony where she reportedly lived, to luxuriate in her life and work.

Derek Owusu
Derek Owusu

a semi-autobiographical novel about a young Ghanaian man reunited with his mother after spending most of his early life living with a white foster family, and the issues raised in negotiating the two cultures.

C.L.R James and James Walvin
C.L.R James and James Walvin

Documenting the sole successful slave revolt in history, The Black Jacobins paints a fascinating portrait of its leader Toussaint Louverture and his role in the birth of the independent Black state of Haiti.

Carly Phillips
Carly Phillips

Charting the destinies of two young people on a Trinidadian plantation in the aftermath of the abolition of slavery, Cambridge lays bare societal hypocrisy with piercing insight and nuance.

Bernadine Evaristo
Bernadine Evaristo

Bursting with life, vigour and energy, Evaristo’s kinetic verse novel views Roman London through the eyes of an irrepressible Nubian teen determined not to become the property of a pompous old dignitary.

Ashleigh Nugent
Ashleigh Nugent

Aeon is a mixed-race teenager from an English suburb. He is desperate to understand the Black identity foisted on him by teachers, police and 'friends'. For want of Black role models, Aoen has immersed himself in gangsta rap, he's trying to grow dreadlocks and he's bought himself some big red boots. And now he's in Jamaica. Within days of being in Jamaica, fighting for survival, respect, and his sense of identity for here he is a white boy.

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